30 Days of Global Flight

February 03,2017

30 Days of Global Flight

In the 30 days of June 2016 we tracked a record 4,813,051 flights. We also set a new single-day record with 175,107 flights tracked on Friday, 24 June. On average, we tracked 160,435 flights per day.

                                                                         

We put together a time lapse of global flight for June, showing all 30 days and millions of flights. See if you can pick out some of the patterns that develop.

A Time Lapse of Global Flight

By the Numbers

Twice in June we set single-day records for the number of flights tracked. On 10 June we set a record of 172,102 flights and on 24 June we broke that record while tracking 175,107 flights. Both days were Fridays, which is consistently the busiest day of the week. As you can see in the chart below, traffic peaks on Friday each week, then falls over the weekend before climbing again as the week goes on.

The third week in June was the busiest of the month. We tracked 1,147,555 flights, for an average of 163,936 flights tracked each day. In the week prior we tracked slightly fewer flights, averaging 161,222 per day.

We’re looking forward to tracking even more flights in July, including those from our recent satellite-based ADS-B test. Follow every flight at Flightradar24.com.

Read More

Jet Lag & Sleep

February 03,2017

Whether you're a "Road Warrior" who has piled up thousands of Frequent Flier Miles, or someone who is planning a vacation to a distant location, you are likely to experience the phenomenon of "jet lag," which can have a profound effect on your sleep and alertness. Every day, millions of travelers struggle against one of the most common sleep disorders — jet lag. For years, jet lag was considered merely a state of mind. Now, studies have shown that the condition actually results from an imbalance in our body's natural "biological clock" caused by traveling to different time zones. Basically, our bodies work on a 24-hour cycle called "circadian rhythms." These rhythms are measured by the distinct rise and fall of body temperature, plasma levels of certain hormones and other biological conditions. All of these are influenced by our exposure to sunlight and help determine when we sleep and when we wake.

When traveling to a new time zone, our circadian rhythms are slow to adjust and remain on their original biological schedule for several days. This results in our bodies telling us it is time to sleep, when it's actually the middle of the afternoon, or it makes us want to stay awake when it is late at night. This experience is known as jet lag.

The National Sleep Foundation

Read More