Travelling for People Who Love to Meditate

December 22,2017

Meditation is a great way to gain focus, mindfulness and a center yourself. In modern-day life, it can be hard to maintain a routine of meditation, which may mean that you’re keen to find somewhere quiet and serene to practice properly and cleanse your mind.

 

In this article, we consider some of the best places for travelers to muse and meditate, and some great ways that you can pick up healthy habits while you’re on the road. We consider particular locations where you can get your meditation fix and offer some tips on opening your mind.

 

·         Your Chosen Type of Meditation: depending on how serious you are, you might want to consider which particular type of meditation you want to pursue. Learning generally about meditation is useful too, but it’s a good idea to think about why you want to meditate before choosing how to do it. Guided Visualisation, for example, is concerned with visualizing what you want to achieve and experience, while Transcendental Meditation is about finding inner peace. Other types of meditation steeped in religious practice have other goals and ambitions.

 

·         Meditation Retreats: if you’re especially eager to learn the tips and tricks of mindfulness, a meditation retreat can be a great way to do it. These types of opportunities are available all over the world, and allow visitors to stay for a while and live in peace while they practice - and learn about - meditation. Types of retreats include:

 

o   Buddhist getaways in Asia, which are often hosted in monasteries and other religious buildings. Popular in countries such as Thailand, India, and Nepal, these can take many forms, including some arrangements where you work and live on location in return for your learning. Many of these are silent retreats, in which learners must remain entirely silent for the duration of their stay. Because countries like Thailand are awash with tourists, the more laid-back of these locations can be an accessible and affordable choice for beginners or just those with a curiosity. It’s also important to note that not all Buddhist meditation is the same: according to the particular beliefs of the varying forms of Buddhism (of which there are many!), you might experience and learn a whole host of different things.

o   Native American retreats in Northern America often take place in lands considered to be sacred. In locations where Native Americans visited to foster the land for its therapeutic qualities, travellers can now go to do much the same. Because of their location and relative rarity, these are often – though not always - quite luxurious and expensive, and hosted in modern buildings.

o   Non-religious mindfulness centers are available throughout the world and avoid religious mantras and ideas. Rather, these simply explore ideas around mindfulness, teaching learners how to be aware of themselves and their surroundings without any theism. These are a very good option if you want to reduce and avoid stress, but you don’t want to learn about any of the religious foundations of meditation and mindfulness.

o   Natural retreats are available throughout the world and might be attractive to people who love the grace and grandeur of the great outdoors. You may camp outside, sleep in the forest or live on a beach, and the range varies widely and wildly. Many of the retreats mentioned above may also feature natural aspects, which can enable you to combine more than one type of guided getaway.

 

Because there are so many meditation retreats throughout the world, it’s impossible to fully summarise all the options available. But there are plenty! Other retreats offer teachings on Shambhala, yoga, dancing and ancient beliefs. Because of the vast options available, it’s good to think about what you’re trying to achieve, and what type of place will help you to achieve it. It’s also essential to opt for a good, reliable location with plenty of trustworthy reviews to make sure that you’re getting something which is worth your money and time. Many meditation centres are an excellent experience and opportunity, but many sadly exist only to take your business.

 

·         If you’re not quite ready to head to a retreat and sign yourself up for a big commitment, there are other places you can go to feel at peace with yourself and at one with the world. These include:

o   Camping: pitching a tent somewhere quiet and calm can be an excellent way to take time away from real life and give yourself the space needed to focus your mind. Quiet and quaint campsites around the world offer ample opportunities of serenity and silence.

o   Beaches, forests and other natural spots provide a great way to get away, even for a day or two. Hiking in nature and taking some time to meditate while you’re there may be enough for some. There are thousands of suitable locations throughout the world, and these places also offer good exercise, experiences, and views.

 

·         Meditation doesn’t have to be the absolute goal of your trip. It’s important to note that if you want to combine travel with brief periods of mindfulness, that’s okay too, and you don’t need to dedicate all of your time to meditation in order to find more peace. Simply being in a different place may give you space and time you need to feel more free and clear. This freedom can allow for brief periods of meditation in nature, or even in your hotel room or while you’re on public transport. A city break can absolutely be used to find brief periods of silence and serenity.

 

Meditation really is a brilliant way to achieve more peace and mindfulness, and an excellent method of battling stress. Traveling can give you the break you need to fully unpack your brain and engage with tranquility and acceptance. So whether it’s a retreat, on the beach, or simply in your hotel room, book a ticket, get away and give you and your brain the time and space you deserve.